Why diplomats make good authors

As a former diplomat and strong advocate of the long view in history, I think I’ve got more experience than most of the good and bad in human nature amongst the many people I’ve met in my career. Like many authors I draw extensively on this experience in my writing, and A Motif of Seasons is no different.

For example, many things I learned and witnessed during my four-year posting to Berlin from 1985-89 made their way into the German settings in the book. In particular, I drew on my knowledge of diplomacy and how it works (little has changed in its principles and basic application over the past 200 years). It also informed the development of one of the main characters, lawyer Charles Hardinge, whose shrewd ability to observe events, people and their motives would have made him a good diplomat.

My diplomatic background also meant that I was able easily to draw on forty years of being part of the British foreign policy-making machine: of meeting particular historical figures (such as Henry Kissinger, US President Ford and Margaret Thatcher); as well as brave young Iraqis risking their lives to come to work in the Foreign Ministry I was helping to reform after the fall of Saddam Hussein; and not least the Deputy Foreign Minister of Iraq at the time, a close personal friend who was assassinated.

Above all, however, it is my first-hand experience of the extent to which fate – the unexpected – often has an impact on human affairs that has influenced my writing the most.

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